Isn't it funny how within 24h the approach to #Keybase changed from "it's secure and awesomesauce, use it for everything!!1!" to "I just use it to share stuff but warn users not to do sensitive stuff there"?

No, actually it's not funny. Because it keeps happening:

1. a new shiny startup does X in an open source but centralized way
2. a lot of "experts" saying how great it is; some greybeards warn that it's centralized but nobody listens - it's so shiny and cool!
(cont.)

(cont.)
3. startup makes a horrible business decision or gets bought up by someone onerous; it's inevitable, it's a startup.
4. everybody's shocked, shocked™, but still go with "using it for non-sensitive stuff, too late to move on"
5. rinse, repeat.

Do you know why we don't get a proper, decentralized, easy to use software solutions? This is why. Because we keep letting shitty startups crowd out the good projects.

(cont.)

Show thread
Follow

@rysiek

Part of the vicious cycle of open-source projects is the 80/20 rule unfortunately: 20% effort goes on actually solving challenging problems while 80% goes on GUI, user support, documentation, bug reports, testing, infrastructure and other horribly boring stuff. And when you're an user, FOSS or not, you will always expect at least base level of stability and usage comfort. That's why I stopped using any Matrix clients other than Riot, because they sucked from usability perspective...

@kravietz @rysiek Or let's say they should go on it.

In reality, everyone just wants to code away on the backend.

You've got one poor sap who's forced to make a graphical frontend although he'd rather work on the backend, and he's got no clue whatsoever about GUI design.

If there's any documentation, it's written by backend developers from a backend developer's POV (that's all they can), incomprehensible for end users and terribly outdated because nobody wants to work on it.

(TBC...)

@kravietz @rysiek (...Continued)

Support is left to those users who have managed to grok the whole thing without any documentation or precious little of it. The devs don't do support because they can't talk to people who aren't software developers. Also, at least 90% of them have crippling social anxiety.

This is also the reason why the whole project remains an obscure grassroots thing: Nobody is willing and able to advertise it to anyone, especially not in a way that end users understand.

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Mastodon 🔐 privacytools.io

Fast, secure and up-to-date instance. PrivacyTools provides knowledge and tools to protect your privacy against global mass surveillance.

Website: privacytools.io
Matrix Chat: chat.privacytools.io
Support us on OpenCollective, many contributions are tax deductible!